Hi
Hi

The Cactus

Make like a cactus and save.

The cactus is one of the most efficient specimens on Earth when it comes to water usage.

Cacti have adapted to grow in arid climates, where there is very little annual rainfall. Cacti are able to survive this harsh climate with no rainfall for months at a time. As humans, let's learn from these hardy little creatures and find out ways to adapt to the current conditions, as well as the aftermath, of the California drought.

1. The cactus's stem acts as a flexible reservoir. It expands and contracts depending on the amount of water it is holding. Its waxy skin helps retain any moisture it has been able to absorb.

2. To protect itself from any animals that may steal its water, it grows prickly spines.

3. It has developed a specialized root system to take advantage of any water source. To absorb as much water as possible, the roots grow close to the surface and extend further away from the plant.

4. To conserve water, the cactus will dry up and break off roots that are not necessary. Other species have evolved to break off stems as well in order to save its water supply.

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

The Drought

Wake up and smell the dust.

California is about to enter its fifth year of drought.

Back in January of 2014, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued a mandatory 25% reduction in state-wide water consumption along with a state of emergency. Now, as the state heads into yet another year of drought, Governor Brown once again calls upon the worried residents of California to further reduce the use of water.

This form of water conservation has come in many different forms, from household water conservation to new technology. Even still, there are many more things we can do to save water. It has become imperative that we change the way we consume, and this is why.

1. The past four years of precipitation deficit has caused more than 15 MILLION ACRE-FEET of groundwater and reservoir depletion.

2. The need to allocate current water sources to aquatic populations will further exacerbate the drought's already long-lasting effects.

3. Almost half the state is now in "exceptional" drought (this is the highest, most serious drought category).

4. On April 1, 2015, the Sierra snowpack was measured at 5% of its average for that date. This snowpack is crucial to the replenishment of rivers, lakes, and reservoirs and provides about one-third of the water for the State of California.

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Fashion and Water Usage

Big numbers are scary.

Our freshwater supply is quickly depleting. Guess who's one of the biggest culprits.

1. The fashion industry ranks second in overall water usage. In the world ... :(

The fast fast industry uses 70 million tons a year.

2. Many of your favorite fast fashion labels release hazardous chemicals into waterways around the world, rendering freshwater unusable.

3. The textile industry produces and releases 2.5 billion tons of wastewater every year. That ranks them third overall.

Where does all that wastewater go? In our freshwater supply.

Cotton. Not as fluffy as you think.

4. Cotton makes up 90% of natural fibers used in the textile industry.

How much water does 1 kg of cotton take to grow? 30,000 liters.

5. The Aral Sea is shrinking. Why? Two of its feeding rivers have been diverted to provide cotton plantations with water.

6. Cotton agriculture is the cause of 24% of the total pollution caused by agriculture. And yeah, that pollution ends up in our water.

That's even with taking up only 2.4% of the world's crop land.

Dy(e)ing.

7. Textile dyeing and treatment contributes up to 20% of overall industrial water pollution.

8. It can take up to 600 liters of water to dye 1 kg of fabric.

9. An estimated 8,000 synthetic chemicals are used and released during the dyeing and treatment process.

These are released into our freshwater supply. OUR FRESHWATER SUPPLY.

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Let's Take Action

That's right, you can help too!

Our goal at Prickly Pear is to lower water usage on both a manufacturing level and a household level.

We only use repurposed or vintage fabrics and garments. By eliminating the need for treating and processing fabrics and materials, we save water. We're also stopping these usable materials from ending up in landfills.

As a result of this, each garment is one-of-a-kind, and requires special washing instructions. These instructions also help the consumer stay more aware of laundry habits at home. By washing your handmade garment only occasionally, the consumer takes a huge chunk out of household water usage.

How can you help?

Follow Prickly Pear's guidelines to take care of your clothing and to prepare for the drought's long-lasting effects.

Furthermore, by purchasing a garment from Prickly Pear, you as the consumer are made fully aware of where your garment came from and how it came to be.

The following symbols are found on your garment tags upon purchase. Follow this guide to start saving the world!

When to wash

Wear your garments at least two times before washing them.

Wear your garment for two weeks (or 14 days) before washing.

Wear your garment for two months (or 30 days) before washing.

How to wash

Make sure only to wash full loads of laundry. Wash by hand for any smaller loads and reuse the water.

If you must wash, only use cold water to save energy!

In between washings, you may store your garment in the freezer to kill some of the germs and to keep your garment fresh.

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Lookbook

The fabric of this dress was repurposed from curtains.

Location: Joshua Tree National Park, California.

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi

Hi